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Archive for the ‘Google’ Category

Google files experimental applications to test in 3.5, 5.8, 24, 72, and 82 GHz bands

On October 13 Google filed two experimental radio applications with the FCC. The first seeks permission to test in the 3.5 GHz band in Mountain View, California and in suburban Washington D.C. The second is for testing in the 5.8, 24, 72, and 82 GHz bands in Mountain View and San Mateo County, California. The applications are redacted. Most technical detail is unavailable, but here’s what’s visible.

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to 3.5 GHz, Google, Millimeter-wave, Propagation @ 1:37 pm, 10/14/14 | No Comments

Google files to test millimeter-wave data with airborne terminals

Google has applied to the FCC to conduct “airborne” testing of data over millimeter-wave frequencies in Northern Nevada. I saw the frequencies and thought this was another test of millimeter-wave radar for automatic cruise control; Google has applied to test that several times since 2011. The emission designators for the current transmissions, however, contain the symbols D1D; that’s data, not radar. An application to the FCC to test millimeter-wave data is a first for Google.

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Drones, Experimental, Google, Millimeter-wave @ 8:50 pm, 09/25/14 | No Comments

Google files “confidential” application with FCC for drone tests in New Mexico

Google has filed an application with the FCC to conduct drone tests in New Mexico. The company has sought confidential treatment of its application form and exhibits. All we have to go by now is one exhibit that’s been redacted for public consumption. Google provides some detail, and we can try to infer some more.

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Drones, Experimental, Google, Unlicensed @ 10:51 am, 09/15/14 | No Comments

Google files with FCC for what might be connected-car experiment

Update March 27, 2014: A few days after this application was filed, it was apparently withdrawn. The links below to the application form and exhibits no longer work, and I see no trace of the application. The essential application information is still in my original post below. I don’t know why the application was withdrawn. The application was apparently prepared by an engineer based at a Google office in Seattle. To me, it seemed incomplete in some aspects. Usually, such applications are prepared by Google’s attorneys; I speculate this caught the attorneys unaware, they didn’t like it, and they pulled the application for their review. Look for it to be recast and filed again. 

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Google yesterday filed an application with the FCC for an experimental radio license that apparently involves connected-car technology. No specific location for the experiment is indicated; it’s to take place in the “Seattle and San Francisco areas.” A total of 10,000 transmitting units are involved, with 5,000 being custom experimental devices manufactured by Google, and 5,000 consisting of off-the-shelf CSR CSR8311 Bluetooth ICs, which the manufacturer describes as the “first Wideband Speech IC qualified for the automotive market” and “the first Bluetooth low energy IC ready for automotive use.” I speculate the IC will be used in combination with the Google device, for a total of 5,000 experimental radio systems. There’s only one frequency band (2402-2480 MHz) and one emission designator (1M00F1D) specified in the application; these parameters are consistent with Bluetooth, so the custom Google transmitter would seem to have Bluetooth-like emissions.

Supporting exhibits are usually filed with experimental applications. Google has done so, but designated them “not available,” presumably invoking confidentiality provisions of the FCC’s Rules. It’s standard FCC practice to have the applicant make the confidentiality request visible to the public. Google has not. Furthermore, from the exhibit descriptions, it appears Google has not even filed a confidentiality request. I expect the FCC to ask Google to do so and to make it public. If there are updates to this application, I’ll update this post.

 

Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Automotive, Bluetooth, Connected Car, Experimental, Google @ 7:01 am, 03/14/14 | No Comments

Google files confidential experimental radio application at the FCC (updated)

On January 22 Google filed an experimental radio application at the FCC. The company has requested confidential treatment of the application, so significant portions aren’t publicly available.

As part of the filing, Google filed a request for confidentiality, which is public. It contains a few technical details. Two separate transmitter types are identified, both operating at low power in the range 76-77 GHz, and using FM and BPSK modulation. The 76-77 GHz band is used for short-range vehicular radar and, knowing Google’s interest in vehicles, it’s reasonable to assume that is what the experiment involves.

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to 76-77 GHz, Experimental, Google, Millimeter-wave, Vehicular Radar @ 2:48 pm, 01/23/14 | No Comments

FCC conditionally approves Google’s ‘confidential’ Mountain View radio experiment

Today the FCC granted Google’s application to conduct a radio experiment in Mountain View, California. When I looked at the application in January, I noted Google withheld some information it felt was confidential, and I took a crack at trying to figure out what was going on based on available information. A couple of days later, the FCC asked Google to provide additional information, and Google responded. Then things sat with no apparent activity for a couple of months.

The experimental license issued today gives Google the authority it sought: use of the 2524-2546 MHz and 2567-2625 MHz bands. In January I noted those bands might be used by Clearwire. In January the FCC asked Google if it had consent from the license holder. Google responded that it “understands that a grant will be conditioned on coordination with affected licensees, and is engaged in discussions to satisfy that obligation.”

Apparently Google hasn’t furnished such consent to the FCC, as the experimental license contains the following “special condition:”

Prior to operation, licensee must successfully coordinate with existing and future Broadband Radio Service/Educational Broadband Service (BRS/EBS) licensees or lessees (as applicable).

So, the FCC is relying on the honor system, which isn’t unusual for experimental authorizations.

Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Clearwire, Experimental, Google @ 9:59 am, 03/28/13 | No Comments

Google responds to FCC request for more info about experimental radio project

In my post about Google’s latest experimental radio application, I observed it seemed incomplete. Yesterday, the FCC sent Google, through its attorney, an email asking for the missing information:

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Clearwire, Experimental, Google, LTE, Small Cells, UMTS @ 2:38 pm, 01/26/13 | No Comments

Google’s “confidential” test might be a super-dense LTE network using Clearwire’s spectrum

Google filed an application at the FCC last week seeking permission to conduct testing of an experimental radio system.  Portions of the application and accompanying exhibits have been designated confidential and are thus not available to the public. Even the request for confidential treatment has been redacted. Let’s try to infer what’s happening from the information available.

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Clearwire, Experimental, Google, LTE, Small Cells @ 1:32 pm, 01/23/13 | No Comments

Google Finishing Development of Personal Communication/Entertainment Device

It appears Google is finalizing the design of what it variously calls, in recent FCC filings, a “personal communication device” or an “entertainment device.” It further appears it would be an unlicensed device supporting both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, and operate at low power in the bands 2400-2483 MHz and 5180-5825 MHz.

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Bluetooth, Equipment Authorization, Google, Unlicensed, Wi-Fi @ 6:47 am, 07/18/12 | No Comments

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