Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during February 27 – March 14. These are related to smart grid, antennas, radar, military, satellite, data links, roaming services, maritime communications, WiMAX, network protocols, and UAVs.

  • Sensus Spectrum filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for special temporary authority to test European Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) equipment on 412-424 MHz.
  • The University of Colorado filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for special temporary authority to test the feasibility of synthetic aperture radar in an end-fire configuration. This configuration will output short (50ns) bursts of approximately 10W at 500-530 MHz in order to construct an image of objects in an adjacent parking lot. This is an attempt to prove the feasibility of a new radar configuration for a proposal to NASA.
  • Oceanit filed an application for special temporary authority for a Ku-band SATCOM transmission test with an experimental ground-based phased-array antenna. Operation is to be on 13.75-14.50 GHz.
  • Northrop Grumman filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for special temporary authority to test an electronically-scanned-array radar system intended to act as part of a missile interceptor system to protect against rocket, artillery and mortar threats. Operation is to be on 16.2-17.3 GHz.

  • Modulation Sciences filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for an experimental license to develop equipment and techniques for Data Return Link (DRL) use in conjunction with Electronic News Gathering (ENG). The company will test a variety of formats and equipment configurations in various propagation conditions including areas with significant urban clutter. Operation is to be on 2025 and 2109.5-2110 MHz.
  • Goodrich Corporation ISR Systems filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for special temporary authority (STA) for testing and demonstration of a new high data rate microwave RF data link. The STA will enable Goodrich ISR Systems to conduct limited low-power free-space testing of integrated system to ensure proper RF systems interoperation, including of the antennas and their control systems. Operation is to be on 14.700-14.825 GHz and 15.15-15.35 GHz.

This data link is in support of a reconnaissance system including both an airborne imaging sensor and a ground data exploitation station, which are connected via a high-rate line-of-sight Ku-band microwave data link. This testing will validate the design for systems under development for delivery under several programs, one of which is the Royal Moroccan Air Force F-16 Airborne Reconnaissance System.

  • Syniverse Technologies filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for special temporary authority to experiment with wireless roaming solutions and fraud services associated with GSM SIM Cards. Operation is to be on 1900 MHz.
  • Geo-Marine filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for experimental license to test bird-detection radar systems associated with aviation. Geo-Marine is doing this as a subcontractor to the University of Illinois. The work is part of a Federal Aviation Administration R&D program related to development of a National Bird Strike Hazard Advisory System. The proposed research will involve the deployment of two Furuno marine radar units. These units are authorized by the Commission for use on navigable waterways, but currently are not approved for use in land-based applications. Operation is to be on 3050 and 9410 MHz.
  • Lockheed Martin filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for experimental license to develop Maritime Traffic Management systems and demonstrate capabilities to customers. The company intends to use the license for development testing, evaluation, and demonstration of commercially-available mobile VHF FM maritime voice communication radios and AIS international-standard maritime transponders, used in maritime surveillance systems. Operation is to be on various frequencies from 156.025 to 161.525 MHz.
  • Lockheed Martin also filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for experimental license to test a system transmitting NTSC analog video signals from a small unmanned aerial vehicle to a ground station. Operation is to be on various frequencies from 910 to 2510 MHz.
  • The University of Maryland MAXWell Laboratory filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for an experimental license to test applications for 4G WiMAX mobile broadband networks. The proposed experiment supports deliverables in several government contracts, including for the study of 4G applications, self-diagnostic network protocols, and a National Science Foundation project, “NeTS: Small: Greed?Resistant Protocols,” that is studying techniques for striping individual Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connections over multiple 3G and 4G wireless networks. Operation is to be on 2498.5-2687.5 MHz.

The MAXWell Lab is a partnership among the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS), the Laboratory for Telecommunications Sciences (LTS), and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)).

  • Clearwire filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for special temporary authority. Clearwire wants to validate the features and quantitatively measure performance of a 4G Radio Access Network infrastructure in a field and lab environment. It also intends to study performance of WiMAX and 4G technology under various interference conditions, as well as varying channel and loading conditions. Operation is to be in the Kansas City, Kansas area on 2502.0-2568.0 MHz.
  • Raytheon filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for experimental license for testing of multi-function radio frequency system (MFRFS) compact high-gain active-phase-array radar. In the testing, a Moving Target Simulator (MTS) is to be used to transmit updated targeting information (an event timing table) to the Active Protection System (APS) Counter Measure (CM) via the MTS horn antenna and CM-mounted Down Converter Communication Module (DCCM) (the receiving data link). The MTS is used to emulate, in controlled test conditions, the function provided by the MRFRS Radar in a tactical environment. Operation is to be on 34-38 GHz.
  • Lamba Consulting filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for experimental license to test the concept of translating a Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) burst signal to another frequency. This translation (reradiation on a different frequency) is done to extend the range of the signal. (The translator hardware does not demodulate the signal as it contains classified information.) The testing will verify that frequency translation can be made linear enough to maintain the quality of the original signal. Operation is to be on 800.5-803.5 MHz
  • Insitu, Inc. filed an experimental application for which confidential treatment was requested, so few details are publicly available. The company coordinated several frequencies with the FAA, including 1030, 1090, and 1365-1390 MHz.