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Archive for the ‘Ultra-wideband’ Category

Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during September-December 2012. These are related to LF and HF propagation, cognitive radio, satellite telemetry, ultra-wideband (UWB), ground-penetrating and synthetic-aperture radar, mobile broadband, aerial communications (balloons), LTE, managed access, military communications, Wi-Fi, GPS, sensor networks, and MVDDS. The descriptions are sorted by the lowest frequency in the application.

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Experimental radio applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during July and August, 2012. These are related to medium-frequency communications, meteor radar, space-to-space communications, UAV communications, synthetic aperture radar, TV white space, 600 MHz LTE, disaster communications, cellular content caching, GSM, passive intermodulation distortion, ultra-wideband, TDD, ground-mapping radar, Doppler radar, and ground surveillance radar.  The descriptions are sorted by the lowest frequency in the application.

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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection from 289 applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during April, May, and June 2012. These are related to AM, high-frequency propagation, ultra-wideband, frequency-hopped VHF, managed access, small satellites, radar, MIMO, TV white space, low-power FM, stadium wireless service, GSM, and DTV. The descriptions are sorted by the lowest frequency found in the application.

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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during June and July 2011. These are related to AM broadcasting, cognitive radio, land vehicle testing, ultra-wideband, ground penetrating radar, synthetic aperture radar, LTE, autonomous aerial refueling, SONAR telemetry, surveillance radar, wind-farm obstruction lighting, seismic activity detection, directed energy weapons, unmanned helicopter flights, precision electronic warfare, shaped-offset QPSK, Ku-band antennas, TV white space, and missile telemetry. The descriptions are sorted by frequency.

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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during April and May 2011. These are related to TV white space, electromagnetic compatibility testing, train control, point-to-multipoint communications, satellite communications, radar, unmanned aerial vehicles, GPS, ultra-wideband, mobile satellite service, UMTS, mobile broadband picocells, wireless backhaul, and IEEE 802.11p. The descriptions are sorted by frequency.

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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during February 2011. These are related to cognitive radio, land mobile, TV white space, unmanned aircraft systems, satellite terminals, ultra-wideband, wildlife tracking, interference detection, and radar. The descriptions are sorted by frequency.

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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during November 2010. These are related to ultra-wideband (UWB), radar, TV white space, millimeter-wave, mobile satellite terminals, UMTS, military networking, microwave interferometry, flight test telemetry, public safety, and seismic data acquisition.

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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during October 2010. These are related to ultra-wideband, machine-to-machine, satellite, GSM, white space, and radar.

What do I mean by “selection?” I look at all applications for new experimental license or special temporary authority (ignoring renewals, modifications of existing licenses, and transfers of control). From those, I pick the ones I find most interesting, which is most except for the following:

  • GPS repeaters, such as those put in a factory to replicate a GPS environment for testing. (Note, however, that companies regularly get tripped up by not demonstrating compliance with separate NTIA requirements.)
  • Short-term authority for video program production. Someone needs a video link to cover a golf tournament or football game, perhaps by using flight-test telemetry bands (with that coordinator’s permission) for a day.
  • Demonstrations for customers. Demonstrations at trade shows.
  • An application very similar to one covered recently.
  • Applications too vague or lacking enough detail to write much about. If applications are very lacking, FCC staff will sometimes ask for more information.
  • Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) compliance testing including RF immunity testing for compliance with European regulations.
  • RF integration testing. (A radar from company A is paired with telemetry from company B and installed on a ship from company C.)
  • Applications for general-purpose antenna test ranges.
  • Applications for which confidentiality treatment has been sought. Companies can do this under the FCC’s rules, but I suspect it’s overdone at times. The request for confidentiality is made public, and may have some details. (A couple of times I have seen companies put what I think is the confidential information in the confidentiality request.) That, and a bit of independent research, can give me an idea what they’re up to. If I can make an educated guess, I will, saying so.

On to October’s applications:

  • Zimmerman Associates filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for special temporary authority to test the capability of using a full polarimetric UWB radar system for identifying roadside bombs and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Testing is to be on 3100-5600 MHz at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia. The prototype equipment uses time-modulated ultra-wideband (UWB) technology developed by Time Domain Corporation. It generates a signal that is position modulated; the position of the modulated pulse varies randomly in time so as to produce a spectrum that approximates Gaussian noise.

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Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Experimental, GPS, GSM, M2M, Radar, Satellite, Ultra-wideband, White Space @ 11:33 am, 11/03/10 | 1 Comment

Ultra-Wideband: How Regulatory and Standardization Delays Slowed a Wireless Technology

The FCC recently issued an order denying reconsideration petitions in its ultra-wideband (UWB) proceeding. That effectively ends the 12-year UWB rulemaking process. Mitchell Lazarus recounts how UWB became bogged down at the FCC and in a failed standardization attempt in IEEE 802.

UWB, as authorized by the FCC, operates across 3.1 to 10.6 GHz, with very low power at any one frequency; its tendency to cause or receive interference is very low.

IEEE 802 attempted to create a UWB standard in IEEE 802.15.3a but did not, as neither of two competing proposals reached the necessary voting threshold for approval. One of the competing proposals, Multi-band Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (MB-OFDM), has since seen some consumer success in Wireless USB, which is based on a platform maintained by the WiMedia Alliance; data rates are up to 480 Mbps at a range of about 10 feet.

UWB was eventually standardized in IEEE 802.15.4a, where it exists as an alternative physical-layer to standard IEEE 802.15.4-2006, a standard for very low power, low data rate devices. (The IEEE 802.15.3 family is for higher data rates with higher power consumption.) It uses what was the other competing proposal in 802.15.3a, Direct Sequence UWB (DS-UWB). This standardized form of UWB has been commercialized for asset tracking and other location services, but not yet for consumer applications.
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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during May 2010. These are related to WiMAX, sensors, SAW devices, radio-location, ultra-wideband, white space, aircraft passenger communications, landslide monitoring, collision avoidance radar, mobile DTV, LTE, Inmarsat handsets, highway rock-fall monitoring, HF communications, spacecraft link characterization, and interference into broadband access.

  • Polytechnic Institute of NYU filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for experimental license to conduct a network research project using WiMAX on 2535-2540 MHz. This is part of the nationwide Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) project, a suite of infrastructure that will support experimental research in network science and engineering. GENI is supported by the National Science Foundation and managed by the GENI Project Office at BBN Technologies.
  • Mnemonics, Inc. filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for experimental license to operate in support of a research project that is to develop and demonstrate the viability of wirelessly extracting measured data from a network of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor devices. This sensing technique is said to have several advantages over existing sensors, including no wired connections needed to extract data, no power requirements, operation up to 1000 degrees C., and sensor cost in-quantity in the tens of cents each. Operation will be on 915 MHz.

SAW

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Experimental Radio Applications at the FCC

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This summarizes a selection of applications for the Experimental Radio Service received by the FCC during April 16 – April 30, 2010. These are related to GPS, ultra-wideband, high-frequency radar, mobile satellite antennas, and flight test telemetry.

  • Starling Advanced Communications filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for special temporary authority to test vehicle-mounted Ku-band transmit/receive satellite terminals. Data rates will vary from 128 kbps to 2 Mbps. The tests will use the following satellites: Horizons-1 at 127° W.L., Galaxy 17 at 91° W.L., Galaxy 19 at 97° W.L., and Galaxy 16 at 99° W.L.. Operation will be on 14.0 – 14.5 GHz.
  • The Los Angeles County Sherriff’s Department filed an application for which all details are not publicly available due to a request for confidentiality. From available exhibits, it seeks to conduct field testing and evaluation of a through-the-wall surveillance radar prototype developed by Akela, Inc. It appears operation will be in the band 500-3600 MHz.
  • The Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, filed an application (with supporting exhibits) for experimental license to operate equipment in support of the SuperDARN radar network, which is used for research on the upper atmosphere. The equipment to be used is in prototype form from Leicester University in the UK. Operation is to be on various frequencies from 8 to 20 MHz.
  • DRS Codem Systems filed an application for which confidentiality was requested. From available exhibits, the test seems to involve the company’s DRS’s X-Band vehicle-mounted satellite-terminal antenna system.
  • Blue Origin, an aerospace research and development company developing commercial space launch vehicle technology, filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for experimental license to support command and telemetry communications testing in support of its New Shepard project, which consists of two vehicles that are attached at launch but separate during flight. Blue Origin conducts flight testing of these vehicles at its test facility in Culberson County, Texas. Each vehicle needs a separate command and telemetry link. Blue Origin already has authorizations for 2069 MHz, 2202 MHz and 2250 MHz. This application adds 2042 MHz.
  • Raytheon Missile Systems filed an application (with supporting exhibit) for experimental license for missile communications testing. Three radio systems related to range safety are to be tested, and include a Flight Terminate Receiver operating on 420-430 MHz, an S-Band Telemetry transmitter operating on 2200-2290, 2310-2369, and 2360-2390 MHz, and a C-Band transponder operating on 5400-5900 MHz.
  • Greenwood Telecommunications Consultants filed an application (and supporting exhibit) for experimental license to test an in-building GPS navigation network solution developed by Insiteo SA, a French company. Operation is to be on 1563-1589 MHz.
  • Lockheed Martin filed an application for special temporary authority to test strategies to mitigate the impact of co-frequency Radionavigation Satellite Service (e.g., GPS) signals on the operation of a TPS77 radar signal. Operation will be on 1215-1400 MHz.

Posted by Steven J. Crowley to Antennas, Experimental, GPS, High Frequency, Military, Radar, Satellite, Telemetry, Terminals, Ultra-wideband @ 1:23 pm, 05/17/10 | No Comments

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